Ramadan: Blessing or Deprivation? | About Islam
Home > Ask About Parenting > Child Development > Ramadan: Blessing or Deprivation?

Ramadan: Blessing or Deprivation?

Questioner

A (34_female_Egypt)

Reply Date

May 20, 2019

Question

How do we make children realize the importance of reciting the holy Qur’an and offering Prayer during Ramadan? They think that Ramadan is only about abstaining from food and drink; when we tell them that there is more than that, they are not interested in learning and following instructions.

Counselor

Answer


Ramadan: Blessing or Deprivation?

In this counseling answer:

“Many mothers and fathers want their children to deeply internalize Ramadan, as they do, and forget the age difference. I think that concentrating on making Ramadan a warm, positive, and happy experience in the whole house is a priority. We should not expect young children to feel or practice the worship we started when we were older. This does not mean that we should minimize our expectations of our children in this holy month; it just means that we have to prioritize our objectives.”


As-Salamu `Alaykum,

 Yes sister, this is a very important question, but before I reply to it, let me just go back in memory with you to your childhood, and mine, if you allow me. Let us go back to a positive memory or experience we went through as children. Why did we feel happy? What was going on? How ready were we to follow our parents’ instructions following such happy experiences?

What I am trying to tell you, sister, is that we ourselves took some time to internalize the real value of the Qur’an and Ramadan. The older you are, in sha’ Allah, the more you are ready and, hopefully, willing to explore the inner meanings of Ramadan.

Many mothers and fathers want their children to deeply internalize Ramadan, as they do, and forget the age difference. I think that concentrating on making Ramadan a warm, positive, and happy experience in the whole house is a priority. We should not expect young children to feel or practice the worship we started when we were older. This does not mean that we should minimize our expectations of our children in this holy month; it just means that we have to prioritize our objectives.

karim serageldin & naaila clay

The main objective is the general air of the house, which will pave the way to all other objectives. As for Qur’an in the month of Qur’an, it would be a good idea to choose verses that tell the stories children love most and to reflect on them together.

For example, the story of Prophet Ibrahim or of Prophet Yusuf (peace and blessings be upon them); try to link these stories to the children’s own daily lives in a manner they will find enjoyable and understandable. We need to raise children who have a voluntary conscious link to the holy Qur’an stemming from love and choice. A light but consistent daily dose of Qur’an accompanied by linking its meaning and application to daily life is what I would suggest sister.


Check out this counseling video:

May Allah link our hearts and the hearts of our children to the holy Qur’an and grant us, and them, its memorization, understanding, and application.

Ameen.

***

Disclaimer: The conceptualization and recommendations stated in this response are very general and purely based on the limited information that was provided in the question. In no event shall AboutIslam, it’s volunteers, writers, scholars, counselors, or employees be held liable for any direct, indirect, exemplary, punitive, consequential or other damages whatsoever that may arise through your decision or action in the use of the services which our website provides. 

Read more:

Moody and Nervous with Kids During Ramadan, Advice!

In Ramadan, I Don’t Have Time for My Kids

Teenage Son Isolates Himself During Ramadan




About About Islam Counselor

Add Comment


find out more!