Tips on How to Survive Marriage during Quarantine

Tips to Keep the Marriage Healthy

Despite the divorce rate amongst American Muslims being close to 40% in the United States, American Muslim families are committed to identifying ways to keep their marriages healthy.

Open Communication

Being stuck indoors without proper outlets can impact the relationship of any couple around the world. According to Psychology Today, “When people are stressed, they become more withdrawn and distracted, and less affectionate. They also have less time for leisure activities, which leads to alienation between partners.” 

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Combating this stress and alienation starts with having an open and honest conversation with your spouse. These conversations must involve expectations for quality time and individual space.

“My husband and I are intentional about keeping our marriage healthy and strong during this time by spending quality time together but also allowing each other to have quiet and alone time,” Aneesah Ali told AboutIslam.net.

Aneesah and Shahid Ali
Aneesah and Shahid Ali

Quality Time

Couples are spending all-day in each other’s spaces but that doesn’t mean couples are actually spending intentional quality time together. American Muslim couples are making efforts to diversify the type of time spent with their spouses, in an effort to keep their marriages healthy and fresh. 

“My husband and I take walks together and make an effort to exercise as a couple daily,” Sunny Tyrell said.

Sunny and Tommy Tyrell
Sunny and Tommy Tyrell

“My wife and I go on long night walks and drives together to keep our marriage sustained,” Muhi Khwaja said.

Natalie and Muhi Khwaja
Natalie and Muhi Khwaja

“My husband and I pray together and complete our mandatory Qur’an reading each night. This is critical to keep our forty-year marriage alive,” Umayamah Abdul-Ahad said.

Words of Affirmation & Kindness

Marital couples should commit to being extremely cautious of their words and actions towards their spouses during this time. It is easy to fall into a habit of frustration over small irritations from being in close proximity with someone continuously.

However, it is up to each individual couple to commit to treating one another as Allah commanded us in the Quran, “And of His signs is that He created for you from yourselves mates that you may find tranquillity in them; and He placed between you affection and mercy. Indeed in that are signs for a people who give thought,” [Qur’an 30: 21] 

“My husband and I are committed to giving one another constant hugs and words of appreciation during this time of social distancing,” Zahrah Abdullah shared with AboutIslam.net.

Zahrah and Abu Saamir Abdullah
Zahrah and Abu Saamir Abdullah

“I offer lots of compliments for mundane things now, such as cleaning the kitchen, doing the dishes, and even taking showers,” Nadia Madden told AboutIslam.net

Saving Our Marriages

Global pandemics can be traumatic and increase the likelihood of strained personal relationships. However, American Muslim couples are showing faith and resilience in their commitment to their marriages.

It is essential for couples who may be experiencing strife to reach out to a counselor, imam, or trusted friend to help navigate issues that may be related to stress from the quarantine.

Couples must be able to identify the difference between real marital problems and issues that result from anxiety surrounding increased time together.

Our new normal must be defined, communicated, and evaluated on a continuous basis to increase the likelihood of individual marital success. 

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About Sabria Mills
Sabria Mills is the Co-founder and Executive Director of MACE - Muslims Advocates of Children with Exceptionalities. She is an Educational Leader and Social Advocate, who partners with educators, community leaders, and activists to advocate for inclusive spaces for people of all abilities. After spending nearly a decade working in education and addressing the needs of non-profit organizations, Sabria knows what truly drives social reform, equality, and education—and it’s not mastering the social advocacy flavor of the week. It’s how well you connect with the heart-beating people you’re trying to help and communicate your understanding back to them.