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The Case for Writing a Book Rather than Winning an Argument!

Questioner

Anonymous

Reply Date

May 28, 2019

Question

Hello, I just reverted to islam for 2 weeks now. But I have some problem about my mental state because of my ocd and perfectionist. The question I wanna ask you may sound silly and strange, But plz answer me.My problem is that I can't let's go of the past. Before I reverted I'm a deist as I said I have ocd and perfectionist, I always argue with athiest I do it with the reason that I want to win and if I lose or can't finish argumentation or do it as best as I can, I will feel like it is not perfect and cause me very bad feeling. That's the reason.So, I write the list about the argumentation I didn't finish argue yet or didn't respone yet up to 100+ task :( and want to finish it by stand face to face to them someday. After my reverted, I acknowleage that what I'm doing there is so stupid . I do it because I want to win? OHHH so silly. my question is SHOULD I forget all of the argumentation I have with that super stupid motivation? in islamic perspective.*before I became deist I'm a christian at that time I use "PASCAL WAGER" to talk with them first to show them how bad it is if christianity is true and they still remain atheism if they pay attention and want to know (false) way to salvation I will keep evangelise them if their answer is they don't want to hear I will not keep talk with them., So do you think I can use this tactic to dawah too? (in the case that your answer to first part of my question is I should forget the past) so they may listen too me and I can fully dawah them as best as I can :)Again first part It may sound silly but for ocd and perfectionist like me it cause me very bad feeling :(

Consultant

Answer


Argument

Short Answer: A Muslim’s intention in discussing Islam is either to increase their own knowledge, or to impart knowledge. Winning is not the intention, neither is it desirable. Rather than simply forget the past, I would like to suggest you incorporate it into a book detailing your journey to Islam. This way you can talk about your book, and give the argument that convinced you of the truth of Islam. Your argument is then in book form and copies can be made available. This may satisfy your desire to argue and win, in a way that is acceptable in Islam. It would be of benefit to you as well. The issue of using Pascal’s Wager is simply it is just a logical argument, not an Islamic argument. You could try to explain why there is a God based on your own experiences and using the Quran and Sunnah. Something of the truth of Islam must have convinced you. Why not share it?

………….

Actions are according to intentions

Thank you  for your question it raises a few interesting points. An important one is, why argue? You say, to win! If you are trying to convince someone of the truth, that is different to simply winning. Although the result may be the same the intention is different. In Islam, actions follow the intention. Therefore, the intention is all important. The best intention is, to do that act for Allah. This guides us as to what we can and should do, and also what we should avoid doing.

A Muslim’s intention in discussing Islam is either to increase their own knowledge, or to impart knowledge. Winning is not the intention, neither is it desirable. The starting point is to explain the truth of Islam from the primary sources – the Qur’an and Sunnah. All we do is give information, What the listener(s) does/do with that information is up to them. NEVER think that you can bring anyone to Islam. Only Allah can do that.

Allah may choose you to be the person conveying the message of Islam, but that is all.  Now, the information and the methodology are very important. We cannot simply say what we think. Islam is a known entity. It is called the Religion of Truth and we are obligated to learn the truth from the primary sources.

When a Muslim asks questions it should be to seek knowledge or clarification of something that is not properly understood. Questioning just for the sake of asking questions, or attempting to show your own knowledge, is discouraged.

Methodology

The methodology given in the Qur’an is:

“Invite (all) to the way of your Lord (Islam) with wisdom and beautiful preaching and reason with them in the best possible way. Your Lord knows who is misguided from His way, and He knows who is best guided.”  [16:125]

Again, another advice from the Qur’an:

“And do not debate with the People of the Book except with the best words (calling to Allah by means of His signs and by drawing attention to the proofs He has provided), except for those who remain obstinately upon unbelief and would rather wage war.” [29:45]

Ibn Abbas r.a. narrated: When Prophet Muhammad s.a.w.s. sent Mu‘adh  to the Yemen, he told him:

“Invite the people to testify La ilaha ilallah (none has the right to be worshipped but Allah) and that I am the Messenger of Allah, and if they obey you in that, then inform them that Allah has enjoined upon them five daily prayers in every day and night, and if they obey you in that, then inform them that Allah has made it obligatory for them to pay Zakat from their properties and it is to be taken from the wealthy among them and given to the poor among them.” [Bukhari]

Does God Exist?

A case can be made for a power higher than man to be in control of the universe. To say everything happens by chance requires a degree of randomness which defies credibility. You can build your own argument from your own conversion story, and what led you to Islam. Muslims should keep in mind the call to Allah, dawah, is based on two pillars – the Qur’an and the Sunnah, underpinned by Tawheed – the Oneness of Allah..

We should always speak from knowledge, not guess or suppose. The Qur’an tells us:

“Say O Muhammad, this (call to the tauheed of Allah and that all worship should be made purely for Allah alone) is my way: I call to Allah (alone, ascribing no partner to Him), upon certain knowledge (baseerah) myself and those who follow me, and Allah is free from all imperfections and partners, and I am free from those who associate anything in worship along with Him.” [12:108]

Concluding comments

I have tried to present a simple summary of the methodology of calling to Allah (dawah) from the Qur’an and Sunnah. But dawah is much more than this. This presupposes that both the Qur’an and the Sunnah – the life and practice of Muhammad pbuh – are known.

Here, I would suggest a Tafsir of the Qur’an say, Ibn Kathir, and The Sealed Nectar as the life of Muhammad pbuh.

Rather than simply forget the past, I would like to suggest you incorporate it into a book detailing your journey to Islam. This way you can talk about your book, and give the argument that convinced you of the truth of Islam. Your argument is then in book form and copies can be made available. This may satisfy your desire to argue and win, in a way that is acceptable in Islam. It would be of benefit to you as well.

The issue of using Pascal’s Wager is simply it is just a logical argument, not an Islamic argument.

You could try to explain why there is a God based on your own experiences and using the Quran and Sunnah. Something of the truth of Islam must have convinced you. Why not share it?

May Allah bless, help and make Islam easy for you to understand and practice, Amin.

Salam and please keep in touch.

Please continue feeding your curiosity, and find more info in the following links:

How Can I Invite Atheists to Islam?

How to Deal with Debates and Argumentation?

Before Action, Double-Check Your Intention

 

 

 




About Daud Matthews

Daud Matthews was born in 1938, he embraced Islam in 1970, and got married in Pakistan in 1973.

Matthews studied physics and subsequently achieved Chartered Engineer, Fellow of both the British Computer Society and the Institute of Management.He was working initially in physics research labs, he then moved to computer management in 1971. He lived and worked in Saudi Arabia from 1974 to 1997 first with the University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran,and then with King Saud University in Riyadh. He's been involved in da'wah since 1986.

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