Are Digestive Problems Ruining Your Ramadan?

Food Allergies/Food Sensitivities

What are commonly called food allergies are really not “true” food allergies, but rather food sensitivities.

The reason for this is that eating a food your allergic to causes a very specific and immediate response, it can also result in a medical emergency.

Food sensitivities are relatively rare. They aren’t usually life threatening and many people develop them over time.

The most common food sensitivities are to soy, corn, dairy and wheat, although one can have sensitivity to any food. There are lab tests that can determine if you have specific food sensitivity and which foods are causing it.

Support AboutIslam in 2021

However many people have an idea that they may be sensitive to a food already. If this is the case, simply remove that food/foods from your diet and see if your symptoms resolve (see list of symptoms above).

Leaky Gut

Intestinal permeability or leaky gut is a condition in which the lining of the intestines has become damaged allowing the contents passing through them to “leak” out into the blood stream. The most common cause of leaky gut is food sensitivities.

Over time foods that are irritating to the digestive tract cause “openings” to appear in the lining of the gut. As this occurs, large food molecules enter the blood stream and trigger an immune response (causing inflammation).

Every time the offending food such as wheat, milk or corn is ingested, the body becomes conditioned to recognize it as a harmful substance and flu like symptoms occur.

Leaky gut can cause many complications such as malabsorption of nutrients and food allergies. It can also trigger an immune response and cause auto immune disorders.

Removing food sensitivities can ease the symptoms, but it doesn’t resolve the problem or stop the consequences. In order to improve your condition and start the healing process you will need to seek out a competent nutritionist.

Click to read more…

Pages: 1 2 3
About Anisa Abeytia
Anisa Abeytia, B.A. USC , M.A., Stanford is an integrative health specialist currently pursuing a M.S. in Holistic Nutrition. Over the past ten years Anisa has pursued various fields of holistic and traditional medicine. She has studied at the oldest herbal school in the United States and pursued a two year certificate program in Islamic Healing. She writes regularly on the topics of health and nutrition. She maintains the website Women's Healing Circle, a site dedicated to the natural health of women and their families.