Black American Muslims: History of Fighting Racism & Oppression

With America on edge in the wake of the incidents that followed the brutal murder of George Floyd, black American Muslims are standing on the front lines of social justice and reform.

From Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali to Keith Ellison and Dawud Walid, Black American Muslims have been fighting for decades for social justice and end of police brutality.

📚 Read Also: ‘I Can’t Breathe’ – On George Floyd’s Death, Islam and Racism

Here, AboutIslam presents some of Black American Muslims who are leading the fight against racism and oppression.

Black American Muslims: History of Fighting Racism & Oppression - About Islam

Dawud Walid

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Dawud Walid is currently the Executive Director of the Michigan chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-MI). He is also a member of the Michigan Muslim Community Council (MMCC) Imams Committee.

Dawud Walid has been one of the key prominent black figures at the forefront of fighting social injustice and racial inequalities in the black community.

Since the recent uprisings against police brutality, Walid has intentionally led his community through digital discussions on several platforms and served as an advisory voice for several Muslim communities.

Dr. Bilal Ware

Dr. Bilal Ware is a historian, professor, and out-spoken social activist whose teaching focuses on Islamic thought, anti-slavery movements in West Africa and the African Diaspora, and the broader intersection of Race, Religion, and Revolutionary Thought. He has published several books and led countless discussions on race and religion.

Dr. Bilal Ware was recently featured on a webinar titled, “Breaking Idols of Our Time.”

“In the recorded history of creation, shaytan made the first expression of superiority based on his bodily substance and origin. The first thing to understand about racism is that it is the original religion of Satan,” Dr. Bilal Ware spoke during the webinar, Breaking Idols of Our Time this past Sunday. 

Dr. Su’ad Abdul Khabeer

Dr. Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, according to her bio on her website, is a scholar-artist-activist who uses anthropology and performance to explore the intersections of race and popular culture. She serves as a primary voice for initiatives led by Sapelo Square.

Sapelo Square is an online resource for Black Muslims in the United States and has been a pivotal leader in bringing awareness to the plight of black people in this country. 

Dr. Su’ad has been at the center of critical conversations with members of the black community to rectify social inequalities and amplify the experiences of black Americans. 

Margari Hill 

Hill is an adjunct professor, blogger, editor, and freelance writer with articles published in SISTERS, Islamic Monthly, and Spice Digest. She is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of MuslimARC, the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative, an organization focusing on Education for Liberation.

MuslimARC is an human rights education organization. MuslimARC’s work consists of raising awareness and training Muslim communities on issues of racial justice.

MuslimARC is at the center of leading the discussions around racial inequalities during this time. Their leadership offers communities guidance on how to fight structural racial oppression in their individual communities. 

This article is from our archive, originally published on an earlier date, and now republished for its importance.

About Sabria Mills
Sabria Mills is the Co-founder and Executive Director of MACE - Muslims Advocates of Children with Exceptionalities. She is an Educational Leader and Social Advocate, who partners with educators, community leaders, and activists to advocate for inclusive spaces for people of all abilities. After spending nearly a decade working in education and addressing the needs of non-profit organizations, Sabria knows what truly drives social reform, equality, and education—and it’s not mastering the social advocacy flavor of the week. It’s how well you connect with the heart-beating people you’re trying to help and communicate your understanding back to them.