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Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid

Hundreds of British Muslims paraded through Bolton streets on Sunday, October 17, to mark the birthday of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him)

Attendants coming from as far as Scotland and London celebrated the event, which was cancelled last year due to COVID-19 restrictions.

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“I am very happy with that as people are just coming out of Covid,” Sufi Mahmood, from the Naqshbandiyya Aslamiyya group which organized the event, told Asian Image.

“We normally get 4,000 to 5,000 people, that was before Covid. We have more than 1,000 today.”

📚 Read Also:  Remembering Togetherness on Prophet Muhammad’s Birthday

Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
Bolton Muslims Parade to Mark Prophet’s Mawlid - About Islam
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Mahmood stressed that faith was very important to overcome the COVID-19 lockdown.

“Faith has been very important, it gives you an understand [sic] of what you are going through, the problems and the issues in day to day lives,” he said.

“It makes you think you should be more understanding and grateful.

“When people go through hard times you should help each other in all sorts of ways, not just Muslims, the whole community.”

Historians agree that Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was most probably born on the 12th of Rabi’ Al-Awwal around the year 570, as marked by the Gregorian calendar.

Many Muslims see the Prophet’s birthday as an important time to reflect on the life of Muhammad, peace, and blessings be upon him.

Around the world, the celebrations include stalls selling Islamic books, leaflets, clothing, prayer mats, and other materials.