Is Giving Money Instead of Udhiyah Acceptable?

31 July, 2020
Q Today I came across an FB post in which the writer (not an Islamic scholar) claims that the maqsad (purpose) of udhiyah is to feed poor people and the Muslims (even in normal circumstances) could give money to the poor instead of udhiyah since it meets the same maqsad. Is it correct to say that the udhiyah can be replaced by giving money in all circumstances? I find it quite hard to absorb.

Answer

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful. 

All praise and thanks are due to Allah, and peace and blessings be upon His Messenger.


In this fatwa:

1- The purpose of udhiyah is to feed the poor with the meat which is way of bringing happiness to them.

2- If you feel that we overeat animals in the West, look for those other countries in which you can donate meat and it is very useful for the people there.


Dr. Jasser Auda, answers your question in this video:

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About Dr. Jasser Auda
Jasser Auda is a Professor and Al-Shatibi Chair of Maqasid Studies at the International Peace College South Africa, the Executive Director of the Maqasid Institute, a global think tank based in London, and a Visiting Professor of Islamic Law at Carleton University in Canada. He is a Founding and Board Member of the International Union of Muslim Scholars, Member of the European Council for Fatwa and Research, Fellow of the Islamic Fiqh Academy of India, and General Secretary of Yaqazat Feker, a popular youth organization in Egypt. He has a PhD in the philosophy of Islamic law from University of Wales in the UK, and a PhD in systems analysis from University of Waterloo in Canada. Early in his life, he memorized the Quran and studied Fiqh, Usul and Hadith in the halaqas of Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo. He previously worked as: Founding Director of the Maqasid Center in the Philosophy of Islamic Law in London; Founding Deputy Director of the Center for Islamic Ethics in Doha; professor at the University of Waterloo in Canada, Alexandria University in Egypt, Islamic University of Novi Pazar in Sanjaq, Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies, and the American University of Sharjah. He lectured and trained on Islam, its law, spirituality and ethics in dozens of other universities and organizations around the world. He wrote 25 books in Arabic and English, some of which were translated to 25 languages.