Should I Let My Children Attend Udhiyah?

28 July, 2020
Q Should I let my children attend the animal slaughtering during Eid Al-Adha? And at what age they could witness the slaughtering?

Answer

In this counseling answer:

•Speak with your children about the significance of Eid Al-Adha and ask your children if they would like to go. In your explanation, you should include some details about what will happen.

•Please do discuss the history and importance of our special holiday with your children, as well as explain the very humane way that we as Muslims slaughter animals.

•Assess your children’s readiness, talk with them about the history, significance and the slaughter. Encourage them to ask questions and ask if they would like to come.


As salamu alaykum sister,

Shokran for writing to our live session. Your question it is a very important one as Eid al-Adha is almost here and many are already making preparations for festivities.

Depends on your Children

Regarding taking a child (children) to the slaughtering, it really depends on your child. There is no set age, and many children do in fact live on farms and are used to farm life from a very early age.

It will depend on your child’s knowledge about the significance and meaning of Eid Al-Adha, feelings about animal slaughter, your child’s understanding of the humane way in which we slaughter animals, and your child’s preparedness.

Speak to them about the significance of Eid Al-Adha

I kindly suggest insha’Allah, that you speak with your children about the significance of Eid Al-Adha and ask your children if they would like to go.

In your explanation you should include some details about what will happen. Please do discuss the history and importance of our special holiday with your children, as well as explain the very humane way that we as Muslims slaughter animals.

Share your Experiences

You may want to reference the experience your child may have, to when you were a child and saw an animal being slaughtered for the first time.

The sharing of your experience and feelings may assure your child. This may also open up the door for your children to ask you questions.

If your children are unsure, perhaps they can go and visit the farm, yet not watch the slaughter. In this way, you will give them the experience of a farm and the kind people there. They will insha’Allah, also see other children who are running about or playing.

This might be an opportunity for brief bonding time. Seeing other children there may also help to make them feel more comfortable.


Check out this counseling video


Assess their Readiness

Insha’Allah, assess your children’s readiness, talk with them about the history, significance and the slaughter.

Encourage them to ask questions and ask if they would like to come. If there are not ready this year, insha’Allah they will be ready to participate next year. Happy Eid

Salam,

***

Disclaimer: The conceptualization and recommendations stated in this response are very general and purely based on the limited information provided in the question. In no event shall AboutIslam, its counselors or employees be held liable for any damages that may arise from your decision in the use of our services.

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About Aisha Mohammad
Aisha received her PhD in psychology in 2000 and an MS in public health in 2009. Aisha worked as a Counselor/Psychologist for 12 years for Geneva B. Scruggs Community Health Care Center in New York. Aisha specializes in trauma, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, marriage/relationships issues, as well as community-cultural dynamics. She is certified in Restorative Justice/ Healing Circles, Conflict Resolution, Mediation, and is also a certified Life Coach.
Aisha works at a Family Resource Center, and has a part-time practice in which she integrates healing and spirituality using a holistic approach. Aisha plans to open a holistic care counseling center for Muslims and others in the New York area in the future, in sha' Allah. Aisha is also a part of several organizations that advocate for social & food justice. In her spare time she enjoys her family, martial arts classes, Islamic studies as well as working on her book and spoken word projects.