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Will Allah Be Angry If I Think of Suicide?

Questioner

Anonymous

Reply Date

Jun 11, 2018

Question

Assalam alaykum waramatullah. What does Islam say about suicide? Is Allah going to be angry at me just for thinking about it?

Counselor

Answer


Will Allah Be Angry If I Think of Suicide?

In this counseling answer:

Whilst actually committing suicide is a sin, thinking about it is not, unless you act upon it. So, the one who thinks about committing a sin, but then does not go ahead will be rewarded – for overcoming sinful thoughts and resisting the urge to act on them.

However, this does not take away the fact that even thinking about suicide indicates that you must be feeling pretty low and are in need of some support. It is very important that you seek professional help. Talk to your doctor and they will be able to refer you to the necessary person to help you manage such distressing feelings on a more long term basis.


Answer:

Wa ‘Alaikum Salaam wa Rahmatulahi wa Barakatuh,

We are clearly informed in both the Qur’an and Sunnah that suicide is indeed a major sin.

“O you who have believed, do not consume one another’s wealth unjustly but only [in lawful] business by mutual consent. And do not kill yourselves [or one another]. Indeed, Allah is to you ever Merciful.”(4:29)

“Narrated Abu Huraira: The Prophet () said, ‘Whoever purposely throws himself from a mountain and kills himself, will be in the (Hell) Fire falling down into it and abiding therein perpetually forever; and whoever drinks poison and kills himself with it, he will be carrying his poison in his hand and drinking it in the (Hell) Fire wherein he will abide eternally forever; and whoever kills himself with an iron weapon, will be carrying that weapon in his hand and stabbing his `Abdomen with it in the (Hell) Fire wherein he will abide eternally forever.’” (Bukhari)

However, whilst actually committing suicide is a sin, thinking about it is not, unless you act upon it. So, the one who thinks about committing a sin, but then does not go ahead will be rewarded – for overcoming sinful thoughts and resisting the urge to act on them.

‘Abdullah bin ‘Abbas (May Allah be pleased with them) reported: Messenger of Allah () said that Allah, the Glorious, said: “Verily, Allah (SWT) has ordered that the good and the bad deeds be written down. Then He explained it clearly how (to write): He who intends to do a good deed but he does not do it, then Allah records it for him as a full good deed, but if he carries out his intention, then Allah the Exalted, writes it down for him as from ten to seven hundred folds, and even more. But if he intends to do an evil act and has not done it, then Allah writes it down with Him as a full good deed, but if he intends it and has done it, Allah writes it down as one bad deed”. (Al-Bukhari and Muslim)

However, this does not take away the fact that even thinking about suicide indicates that you must be feeling pretty low and are in need of some support. Remember that Allah (swt) has already appointed your time, as He has for all, and it is not for you to interfere with Allah’s (swt) plans. Cutting your life short before Allah (swt) says it’s your time will deprive you of the opportunities to do good during your short time on this earth – opportunities for which you can earn Allah’s (swt) reward and be granted higher ranks in the Hereafter.

“Indeed, all things We created with predestination” (Qur’an, 54:49)

Think of how it would hurt those you love, too. How would you feel if a loved one committed suicide?  You might feel sad that they were suffering so much that they felt the need to commit suicide, especially without coming to seek consolation from you or that you didn’t even notice that they had reached that intense stage of sadness in their life.

Ultimately, if you feel so low that you are even thinking about suicide, it is important that you deal with whatever makes you feel this way. As I do not know your specific circumstances, I cannot advise on this, but I can say that regardless of your circumstances, the first step in overcoming difficulties is to get closer to Allah (swt). This will assist you in dealing with whatever difficulties you are facing. There are many other solutions to our problems other than suicide and Islam has the key to many of these.

The first thing to do is to check yourself. Check whether you engage in all your obligatory acts of worship and pray 5 times a day on time. Once you have established your obligatory duties, you can increase your voluntary duties by setting time aside each day to read the Qur’an (even if it is just for 10-15 minutes after Fajr to begin with), making regular supplications (especially to protect you from Shaytan and his whispers) and praying voluntary prayers being confident that Allah (swt) is always listening to you. Begin with smaller acts and build on them so it does not become too overwhelming.

“Those who have believed and whose hearts are assured by the remembrance of Allah. Unquestionably, by the remembrance of Allah hearts are assured.” (Qur’an, 13:28)

Keeping Allah (swt) in mind as much as possible will bring peace in your heart and contribute to overcome the negative feelings you are experiencing right now.

“…And whoever fears Allah – He will make for him a way out” (Qur’an, 65:2)

Be sure to engage in a good social circle, perhaps one that works together on a particular hobby such as studying the Qur’an or Islamic studies. Likewise, taking a bit of time each day or every other day to go for a walk is a great way to overcome negative feelings, too. It gives you the chance to get some air and appreciate your surroundings – Allah’s (swt) creation. Pay attention to the sights, the sounds, the smells – embrace your experience fully (the endorphins released during exercise are also and excellent mood booster!) Having some kind of hobby or any other thing of interest to you like memorising portions of the Qur’an or improving your recitation skills, studying the Tafsir, or Islamic history can provide you with a sense of purpose which is commonly cited in psychological literature as a means to overcome distressing thoughts and feelings.

Be grateful for the blessings in your life, even the small things; the things you take for granted. You could keep a gratitude journal and write them down or mentally list them (doing this before you sleep is a good time). This is a means of showing gratitude to Allah (swt) and realising that things are not as bad as they seem because you also have many things to be grateful for. Remember that Allah will not test you beyond what you can bear and is all a part of His test which you need to be patient with.

“Allah does not charge a soul except [with that within] its capacity. It will have [the consequence of] what [good] it has gained, and it will bear [the consequence of] what [evil] it has earned….” (Qur’an 2:286)

“And We will surely test you with something of fear and hunger and a loss of wealth and lives and fruits, but give good tidings to the patient, Who, when disaster strikes them, say, “Indeed we belong to Allah , and indeed to Him we will return. Those are the ones upon whom are blessings from their Lord and mercy. And it is those who are the [rightly] guided.” (Qur’an 2: 155-157)

It is also important that you seek professional help. Talk to your doctor and they will be able to refer you to the necessary person to help you manage such distressing feelings on a more long term basis.

May Allah (swt) make it easy for you and help you to overcome your feelings. May He (swt) bring you comfort in the remembrance of Him (swt).

Salam,

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About Hannah Morris

Hannah Morris is a mum of 4 and she currently works as Counsellor and Instructor of BSc. Psychology at the Islamic Online University (IOU). She obtained her MA degree in Psychology and has over 10 years of experience working in health and social care settings in the UK, USA, and Ireland. Check out her personal Facebook page, ActiveMindCare, that promotes psychological well-being in the Ummah. (www.facebook.com/activemindcare)

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