Converting But No Mosques Near Me: What Can I Do?
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Converting But No Mosques Near Me: What Can I Do?

Questioner

Laszl

Reply Date

Jan 06, 2018

Question

I am about to convert to Islam because it is beautiful. However, in my native country, there are no mosques and virtually everybody is Christian. In this milieu what is the proper way to follow? Thanks.

Consultant

Answer


No Mosque

Short Answer: Try to find some through the contacts in Islamicfinder. There are quite a number of mosques and other Islamic services in Hungary, though most of them are in Budapest. Islam should make you a better person, so much so that your family and friends notice an improvement in you. Don’t let yourself be overwhelmed by all the new things you have to learn as a new Muslim. Allah doesn’t expect you to change overnight.

__________________________________________

Salam (Peace) Laszl,

I am so happy for you that you want to be a Muslim.

Alhamdulillah (all praise to Allah) that He has guided you to His religion.

I am also happy to tell you that there are quite a number of mosques and other Islamic services in Hungary, though most of them are in Budapest. You can find them through Islamicfinder.

Insha’ Allah (if Allah wills) through these organizations you will be able to learn more and more about your new religion, and also you will be able to meet other Muslims who might live a reasonable distance from you so that you can get together occasionally, especially for the `Eids (Islamic public celebrations).

As for actually becoming Muslim, you don’t absolutely have to do it publicly. After all, Islam is, first, about your relationship with your Creator and, second, about your relationship with others.

However, it is a good idea to pronounce the Shahadah (testimony of faith) before one or more Muslim witnesses — or even by phone or Internet through some Web sites — because there are some legal ramifications in the case of your death, such as issues of burial and inheritance from you.

I hope that does not frighten you, but Muslims must always keep in mind that they can die at any minute. None of us has any guarantee that we will live to see tomorrow.

And, of course, if you ever get the chance to make Hajj — which I hope you will some day — you might need some documentation that you are Muslim in order to get a visa.

Lifestyle Changes

If you are sincere in your Islam, it will involve some changes in lifestyle.

Most important is that you learn to perform salah, the Muslim ritual Prayer, and that you get into the habit of performing the Prayers five times a day.

The salah is what distinguishes a Muslim from a non-Muslim, so it is essential that you learn to perform salah as soon as possible.

You may have to change your sleeping habits a bit so that you can get up in time for the fajr (dawn) prayer, and it might take some ingenuity to find the time or place to pray at work. But it is so vital for your relationship with Allah.

For some the salah seems like a burden, but it only takes a total of perhaps 45 minutes a day. It is also refreshing—physically and spiritually—so it can actually help you to be better in your work; it should never be thought of as a waste of time.

A Better Person

Your Islam should help you to develop your character.

You should become more honest, trustworthy, kind, generous, modest, chaste, and hardworking.

If you have trouble controlling your temper, Islam should help you to do so. If you are the kind that worries too much, Islam should help you to put your troubles in the hands of Allah.

In short, Islam should make you a better person, so much so that your family and friends notice an improvement in you.

You will also have to give up eating pork and drinking alcohol. It is even forbidden for a Muslim to sit with others who are drinking—and it is a major sin to do so.

This might be a very difficult step if you are in the habit of doing so, especially with friends. But if your friends are real friends, they will understand your need and refrain from drinking in your presence.

You and they can still enjoy playing or watching football, for example; just switch to drinking soft drinks.

All of this will come gradually, of course.

It may be more difficult for you if you don’t have Muslims near you so that you can spend leisure time with them. But who knows, perhaps there are some in the next town. Try to find some through the contacts in Islamicfinder.

It is a great blessing, alhamdulillah that we have the Internet and telephones to help us connect with others who are far away.

Certainly such a long-distance relationship is not the same as personal one, but you might locate some other Muslims near you.

As you grow in your new faith, you will find that your attitude towards many things changing. As you understand Allah more, you will recognize His majesty and His right to make laws that govern our lives.

So many people today, even many of those who call themselves Christians, believe that “times change” and that moral values must change, too.

Even if they worship God once a week, many people do not apply moral or religious values in their daily lives. This, of course, is not how Muslims should think. They know that human nature does not change and that Allah has given us moral laws for our own good.

Gradual Change

My last piece of advice to you is not to let yourself be overwhelmed by all the new things you have to learn as a new Muslim.

Be easy on yourself—but not lax. Allah doesn’t expect you to change overnight. But be steady (and slow) in your efforts.

Improve yourself gradually.

Don’t try to suddenly make too many lifestyle changes at one time; especially don’t throw yourself into doing many extra voluntary acts of worship. Learn the essentials, perform the essentials, and then gradually increase.

Once again, welcome to Islam!

Salam

(This response is from About Islam’s archive and was originally published at an earlier date)

Please continue feeding your curiosity, and find more info in the following links:

New Muslim: How to Minimize Stress?

New Muslims – All You Need in Your New Life

Adjusting to Islamic Lifestyle as a New Muslim – 2




About AElfwine Mischler

AElfwine Mischler is an American convert to Islam. She has undergraduate degrees in physics and English, and a master's degree in linguistics and teaching English as a foreign language.

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